Qué ha cambiado y qué no con Biden en la frontera con México

Transcripción del video

[MUSIC PLAYING]

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]

- The number of migrants crossing into the United States continues to rise.

- The growing crisis at the US-Mexico border.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

ERIKA PINHEIRO: The majority of migrants that we're seeing today on the border have actually been waiting in Tijuana for at least a year and sometimes two years. It's just families living in tents. And what we've seen in years past in these kind of situations is that this is really a booming business model for smugglers.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

President Biden has reopened limited asylum processing. So it's only about here in Tijuana 25 to 40 people a day. By and large, for the rest, the hope has not materialized.

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]

ERIKA PINHEIRO: Because we're not getting guidance from the Biden administration as to when regular asylum processing will reopen, it's just creating a rumor mill really driven by smugglers and other organized crime groups who really want to take advantage of people who are stuck at the border and really expose conditions like those who are living in camps.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

THERESA CARDINAL BROWN: The Biden administration changed one of Trump's policies to say that unaccompanied children would no longer be turned back. So that's one of the reasons we're seeing an uptick now.

- Before the new president took office, we didn't have these types of numbers coming across. We see unaccompanied children all the time.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

THERESA CARDINAL BROWN: The capacity for receiving and processing children into the system has been vastly reduced due to COVID. That has hindered the ability of the Biden administration to admit and process people into facilities appropriate for care of children.

JEN PSAKI: This is not the time to come. We have not had the time to put in place an immigration system, an immigration policy. We don't have the processing we need at the border.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

THERESA CARDINAL BROWN: They have to surge resources. They have to find facilities that can take families and children as soon as possible. That takes time and resources. So I think that's the reality of governing as opposed to campaigning.

JOE BIDEN: I would, in fact, make sure that there is-- we immediately surge to the border all those people who are seeking asylum.

THERESA CARDINAL BROWN: President Biden needs to find a process that can allow people who arrive to be treated humanely but decide relatively quickly whether or not they can stay according to our laws. They need to think about what they're going to do with the immigration courts that are already severely backlogged. Can people file their asylum cases directly with the asylum officers at US Citizenship and Immigration Services? Is it necessary that all cases funnel into those courts?

When the COVID restrictions are no longer necessary, will we have the capacity to process them? Or will we end up having essentially overrun facilities with families and other asylum seekers at the border? I think that's what the Biden administration is hoping to avoid. But it needs to take a lot of steps right now before that happens.

ERIKA PINHEIRO: I have hope that things will improve. But I have to say it's very difficult living here on the border and going into these encampments and talking to the migrants who are suffering every day and telling them that we don't have any answers for them.

[MUSIC PLAYING]