Un féretro "vivo" que convierte cuerpos en composta

SHOTLIST DELFT, HOLANDA MERIDIONAL, HOLANDA15 DE SEPTIEMBRE DE 2020FUENTE: AFPTV 1. Zoom out Bob Hendrikx volviendo a poner la tapa en el ataúd 2. SOUNDBITE 1 - Bob Hendrikx, Fundador de la startup "Loop" (hombre, inglés, 9 seg.): "Este es el primer ataúd vivo y de hecho el sábado pasado el primer ser humano en Países Bajos fue compostado y devuelto al ciclo de la vida" "This is world's first living coffin and actually last Saturday the first human being in the Netherlands was composted and returned into the cycle of life." 3. Plano medio ataúd abierto con musgo en el interior4. Paneo de derecha a izquierda ataúd abierto con musgo en el interior5. Plano medio moldes utilizados para dar forma al ataúd6. Primer plano moldes utilizados para dar forma al ataúd7. Plano medio ataud cerrado8. Primerísimo primer plano insecto vagando sobre el ataúd cerrado 9. SOUNDBITE 2 - Bob Hendrikx, Fundador de la startup "Loop" (hombre, inglés, 12 seg.): "En realidad es un organismo, está hecho con micelio, que es la estructura base de los hongos y son los mayores recicladores en la naturaleza por lo que pueden descomponer nuestro cuerpo en nuevos nutrientes para que florezca la naturaleza " "It's actually an organism so it's made from mycelium which is the root structure of mushrooms and they're the biggest recyclers in nature so they can decompose our body into new nutrients for nature to florish." 10. Plano de apoyo: Zoom out organism used to make the coffin 11. Plano de apoyo: Zoom out estantes con varios materiales y el ataúd 12. Primerísimo primer plano musgo dentro del ataúd 13. SOUNDBITE 3 - Bob Hendrikx, Fundador de la startup "Loop" (hombre, inglés, 14 seg.): "Esta es la forma más natural de hacerlo, asi ya no contaminamos el medio ambiente con las toxinas de nuestro cuerpo y todo lo que va dentro de los ataúdes, sino que en realidad tratamos de enriquecerlo y ser composta para la naturaleza" "This is the most natural way to do it (ed: get buried) in which we no longer pollute the environment with toxins in our body and all the stuff that goes into the coffins but actually try to enrich it and really be compost for nature." 14. Plano de apoyo: Zoom out Bob Hendrikx y un amigo levantando y moviendo el ataúd 15. Plano de apoyo: Zoom out Ataúd cerrado en el césped con estudiantes de TU Delft almorzando en el fondo 16. Plano de apoyo: Paneo de izquierda a derecha Bob Hendrikx y un amigo levantando y moviendo el ataúd ///-----------------------------------------------------------AFP TEXT STORY: EnfoqueDutch inventor's mushroom coffins turn bodies into compost Por Charlotte VAN OUWERKERK =(Fotos+Video)= ATENCIÓN - Video by Sara Magniette ///Delft, Netherlands, 17 Set 2020 (AFP) - In the Netherlands you can keep helping the planet after you die -- by opting for a living coffin made of mushrooms which speeds up the decomposition of your body.The coffin turns corpses into compost that enriches the soil thanks to mycelium, the root structure of fungi.The "Living Cocoon" is a world first, according to Bob Hendrikx, who invented the idea in his student laboratory at Delft Technical University."This is the world's first living coffin, and actually last Saturday the first human being in the Netherlands was composted and returned into the cycle of life," he told AFP.The coffin was the final resting place for an 82-year-old woman, whose body will decompose within two to three years.If a traditional coffin with varnished wood and metal handles is used, the process normally takes more than ten years.The casket itself will meanwhile disappear within 30 to 45 days."It's actually an organism, so it's made from mycelium which is the root structure of mushrooms," Hendrikx said. "They're the biggest recyclers in nature"."This is the most natural way to do it... we no longer pollute the environment with toxins in our body and all the stuff that goes into the coffins but actually try to enrich it and really be compost for nature." - 'Big hit' - The coffin is the same size and shape as a classic coffin but its pale colour is typical of mycelium.Inside is a bed of moss where the body -- and various insects and other soil creatures -- will lie.Overall the coffin is much lighter than a wooden casket. It's also cheaper, currently costing around 1,500 euros.Making the coffins requires a bit of foraging, first for moss from the forest, then collecting mycelium from mushrooms, and then mixing that with woodchips."Slowly in seven days, it's actually pretty fast, it will grow into a solid material that is actually an organism," said Hendrikx."Afterwards it's naturally dried by literally removing the mould and just letting it be. So then the mycelium, the organism, becomes inactive."When it's in the ground, it starts to get activated again when a lot of moisture hits the organism. Then it starts the decomposition process."Hendrikx's inspiration didn't stem from a ghoulish fascination with bodies or human compost, but from serendipity.Fascinated by the applications of mushrooms, he first tried to make a "living house" for his thesis.But when someone asked what would happen with the body of his grandmother if he left her inside the house, Hendrikx had a brainwave.That has now become a start-up, called Loop, which has signed a deal with a funeral home, while also causing a stir on social media."Looking at the reactions we had online, we're pretty sure it's going to be a big hit," he said.cvo/smt/dk/tgb/gle -------------------------------------------------------------