Cómo el coronavirus podría dividir el mundo y cómo afectaría a América Latina

La pandemia de covid-19 y la manera como los países se están enfrentando a ella podría tener como consecuencia la división del planeta por áreas, según la afectación del coronavirus. Según varios expertos, esta división podría provocar un aumento de las desigualdades ya existentes entre países ricos y países en vías de desarrollo. Pese a producirse esta división, expertos creen que no solucionaría el problema a escala mundial, pues el virus "no entiende de fronteras" y va a ser necesaria una iniciativa global para considerarlo superado.

Transcripción del video

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]

JULIAN TANG: You may have a risk coding of countries like green is Europe, green is Southeast Asia, orange is India and Africa, because the vaccine-- it's not really extended very far. And then red might be South Africa, Brazil, USA, where we can see high levels of replication and low levels of vaccination. I think, to be honest, that there may well be a partition either in people's minds, or officially, or on some travel blog.

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]

JULIAN TANG: What I thinks going to happen is that people will become fairly comfortable traveling between those countries that have been vaccinated like UK, Europe. UK, maybe Southeast Asia. That with it's low numbers of virus replication UK, Australia, New Zealand. But they may not go to other areas where there's high viral replication ongoing, like the US at the moment, or South America, or parts of Africa and India, because those viruses are not being controlled by vaccination. And because of that they could be a vaccine escape variant.

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]

PETER BAKER: --and those two things are unfortunately related. There's been a problem with high-income countries over-procuring and over-purchasing vaccines greater than they need for their own populations and this is beginning to limit access to the vaccines to other countries.

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]

CHARLIE WHITTAKER: Experience in both Brazil, the UK, South Africa today have highlighted that the virus doesn't respect international boundaries. It is possible for variants emerging in one place to end up in another place and cause problems there. I think that really underscores the importance of a globally joined up--

- [SPEAKING SPANISH]